Written evidence from The Children’s Society to the Work and Pensions Select Committee on the loss of the Severe Disability Premium under Universal Credit and its impact on disabled single parents and young disabled people moving into independent living.

Month of publication 
July
Year of publication 
2018
Number of pages 
10
Author 
Dr Sam Royston
Category 
Policy and lobbying
Related reports 

Holes in the safety net: The impact of Universal Credit on disabled people and their families - final report

This is a report on the impact the 2012 Welfare Reform Act has on disabled people. It summarises the findings from three research reports, which are based on evidence from surveys of almost 3500 disabled people and their families, as well as a parliamentary evidence session.

Date published 
January 2012
Number of pages 
20

Holes in the safety net: The impact of Universal Credit on disabled people and their families - report 1

This is the first report of the research on the impact of universal credit on families with disabled children. It provides the results and analysis of the survey and also provides recommendations to change policy.

Date published 
January 2012
Number of pages 
26

Holes in the safety net: The impact of the Universal Credit on working disabled people - report 3

This report analyses the findings of the study done to determine the impact the 2012 Welfare Reform Act has on working disabled people. The evidence suggests that removing financial support for disabled people who face extra costs in work would not only cause hardship, but also risks being counterproductive, potentially preventing disabled people from being able to continue in work.

Date published 
January 2012
Number of pages 
22
Benefit sanctions and care leavers - Evidence to Work & Pensions Committee

Benefit sanctions and care leavers - Evidence to Work & Pensions Committee

Written evidence submitted by The Children’s Society to the Work & Pensions Select Committee inquiry on benefit sanctions. This highlights that care leavers are far more likely to have their benefits sanctioned than other claimants, less likely to challenge those sanctions, but more likely to win when they do. The removal of financial support can have devastating consequences for care leavers.

Date published 
May 2018
Number of pages 
7