'I...feel safe, but the

journey hurt me lots'

Fahad's story

Fahad's story

'I feel safe, but the journey, my background, it’s hurt me lots'

Fahad fled his home at 16 years old, leaving behind his family and facing a long and dangerous journey to Europe. Separated from his twin brother in Calais, Fahad arrived in the UK alone with no guardian or support network. Fahad struggled for many months but through one-to-one sessions and support, he has been able to process his trauma and feel safe and settled in a new country. 

OUR WORK WITH YOUNG REFUGEES

'It was really difficult, it wasn't safe'

At just 16 years old, Fahad and his twin brother were forced to flee their home. With little certainty that they would make it to safety, Fahad and his brother began the dangerous journey to Europe.

After many traumatic months, they made it to the ‘Jungle’, a large refugee camp outside of Calais. 

'Every day there was fighting, fire, police'

They had no clothes or belongings, only what they arrived in. Every day was a struggle.

Seeing no other way out, Fahad and his brother joined hundreds of refugees each night to make the long walk to the lorry terminal, where they would hope to make it on to a lorry headed for the UK. Every night they would try to escape, every night the guards would turn them back.

'Lots of people had accidents with the lorries'

After five difficult months in the camp, Fahad finally made it onto a lorry but he was unsure whether his brother had made it.

He waited it out and the next thing he knew, he was staring at a British police officer.  

'It was really difficult, it wasn't safe'

At just 16 years old, Fahad and his twin brother were forced to flee their home. With little certainty that they would make it to safety, Fahad and his brother began the dangerous journey to Europe.

After several traumatic months with no contact to home, they made it to the ‘Jungle’, a large refugee camp outside of Calais. Every day was a struggle.

'Every day there was fighting, fire, police'

They had no clothes or belongings, only what they arrived in. 

Seeing no other way out, Fahad and his brother joined hundreds of refugees each night to make the long walk to the lorry terminal, where they would hope to make it on to a lorry headed for the UK. Every night they would try to escape, every night the guards would turn them back.

'Lots of people had accidents with the lorries'

After five difficult months in the camp, Fahad finally made it onto a lorry but he was unsure whether his brother had made it.

He waited it out and the next thing he knew, he was staring at a British police officer.  

‘I couldn’t speak properly, I couldn’t understand’

Once in the UK, it was not the end of the difficult journey for Fahad. He could speak very little English and had no family or friends in the UK for support.

'I tried to improve my English as fast as possible'

It took a month before he was placed in foster care because the Home Office wrongly assessed his age. Still with no contact from his brother and with very little contact with his family back home, Fahad felt alone and was struggling to adjust to life in a new city.

After one month, Fahad got a call from him twin brother and the two were finally reunited in the UK. Both were still trying to recover but at least they were together. 

‘It was a great moment, because I really missed him’

They were referred to The Children’s Society where Fahad attended a weekly youth group and met his specialist refugee and migrant project worker, Alison.

Alison helped with things like college applications and immigration meetings, and through one-to-one support, Fahad is beginning to recover from the trauma he faced.

'she always tried to understand'

Fahad and his brother are still awaiting a decision on their case for asylum but they now have the support they need to rebuild their lives. Fahad attends college and hopes to one day study politics and work for the United Nations, where he can use his experience to help others. 

‘When we are coming here new, we are like a blind person, which didn’t see nothing'

After one month, Fahad got a call from him twin brother and the two were finally reunited in the UK. Both were still trying to recover but at least they were together. 

‘It was a great moment, because I really missed him’

They were referred to The Children’s Society where Fahad attended a weekly youth group and met his specialist refugee and migrant project worker, Alison.

Alison helped with things like college applications and immigration meetings, and through one-to-one support, Fahad is beginning to recover from the trauma he faced.

'she always tried to understand'

Fahad and his brother are still awaiting a decision on their case for asylum but they now have the support they need to rebuild their lives. Fahad attends college and hopes to one day study politics and work for the United Nations, where he can use his experience to help others. 

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