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Results day on a challenging year

This week students across the country get their exam results. Despite an unsettling year, young people didn't give up. They had to motivate themselves to keep going, keep studying. Here’s a look at how young people are feeling about their grades and what it means for their future.

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exam results

teenager looks at her exam results paper smiling

The waiting game

After months of doing their schoolwork at home, exam cancellations and changes to the grading process, the time has finally come. Young people across the country will get their GCSE and A level results this week.

There will be mixed emotions. For many, it feels like futures depend on what's inside an envelope. As one young person on Twitter puts it:

‘I just realised my results are in a week. Let me practice crying before I need to cry.’ 

School exam results this week

Having it easy?

The big difference this year is that students didn't sit formal exams. Instead, teachers awarded grades to their students. With reports that this year will see the highest grades on record, some students are worrying that people may not take their grades as seriously as previous generations.

One teacher on Twitter argued ‘I know my students worked incredibly hard for their a-levels. The grades they’re receiving reflects their ability and progress made over the past two years. There’s no grade inflation in my dept, why can’t people just trust teachers?’ 

Young people in school uniform

Time for celebration

An a-level student rightly pointed out ‘this year has been tremendously hard for all students. Don’t act like we ‘have it easy’ because of alleged grade inflation. It’s been a year of uncertainty and majority of it has been at home with little support.’ 

Rather than devaluing their results, they should be applauded. To continue learning at home, without normal support. Motivating themselves to get up and do schoolwork. That takes a lot of strength and focus. Their grades, whatever they are, are well earned.

Students and teachers should be incredible proud of what they've achieved this year.