Our response to Alan Milburn’s speech on social mobility and child poverty

13 December 2011

In response to Rt Hon Alan Milburn's first speech as the independent reviewer on social mobility and child poverty, Enver Solomon, Policy Director at The Children's Society said:

'We are delighted that Alan Milburn used his first speech as interim reviewer on child poverty to send out a clear message that child poverty is simply unacceptable in a modern civilised country like Britain. We know from the work we do with some of the most disadvantaged children that poverty is a blight on their future. These children need an adequate family income to feel socially included, as well as services of the very highest quality.

'His crucial focus on support for children in the earliest years of their lives sends a clear message that we need to do more to give children the very best start in life. Sufficient support for childcare, as well as an adequate family income and family support where required, is essential to make sure that families with very young children have the support they vitally need.

'What we must have now is a plan. Despite both child poverty and social mobility strategies being produced this year, we have yet to see a clear and coherent approach to meet the 2020 target, an objective that remains vitally important to lift children out of poverty.'

Full text of Alan Milburn's speech is available.

Ends

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Note to editors

  • The Children's Society supports nearly 50,000 children and young people every year through our specialist services and children’s centres. We believe in achieving a better childhood for every child but have a particular focus on children who have nowhere else to turn, such as children in families living in poverty, young refugees, children at risk on the streets, disabled children and children in trouble with the law. We seek to give a voice to children and young people and influence policy and practice so they have a better chance in life.