Posted: 02 December 2013

Advent: On the journey out of the darkness and into the light

Things always look better from on high. I remember standing on the misty heights of Table Mountain in Cape Town, South Africa, gasping at the stunning sights stretching before me. It was a similar feeling I felt when gliding in a cable car in the Hakone region of Japan, catching a glimpse of Mount Fuji in the distance.

Far above sea level, you don’t see the litter on the streets or people being rude to each other. You don’t see children suffering, the vulnerable and disadvantaged. I wish we could take these children out of the dark circumstances in which they live, lifting them to those beautiful heights where their troubles melt away. I wish we could give them a vision of what Isaiah saw where 'the mountain of the Lord’s temple will be established as the highest of the mountains; it will be exalted above the hills'. 

'Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord,' I’d say. 

In my experiences of having mentored young people, I've relished the opportunities to lift their eyes, to raise their aspirations and their hopes, to tell them that their past doesn't have to define their future story. 

Isaiah 2:5 reads: 'Come, descendants of Jacob, let us walk in the light of the Lord.' The word 'come' in Isaiah’s vision is an invitation. It’s a call to another to take a step on the journey out of the darkness and into the light. But the implication is that the journey can’t be made alone, that it is about walking together into a hope and a future. As we think about light this week, may we think about those whom we can walk together and alongside out of their darkness into his light.

 

More about Advent

Visit our Advent calendar blog

Read more about this year’s Advent calendar blog

By Chine Mbubaegbu - Guest bloggers

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